Previously, I had made a video camera boom stand using the base of a stand fan. It could be moved around easily at my workshop because I had fitted castor wheels on it. Now, I had a need to use my welding machine in my workshop, so I decided to make use of the same stand for this purpose. This was modeled after another version that I had made in my previous house, of which I was not able to bring along with me to my new house.

I had to fabricate a piece of plywood for supporting the welding machine. The plywood was fitted with a means to secure it to the vertical spindle of the stand. The height adjusting mechanism was already a built-in feature when it was functioning as a stand fan.

The reason for me to use the welding machine stand was because the welding machine came with quite short lengths of welding cables. These cables were the electrode holder cable and the earth cable. They were thick cables so that they could carry high currents during the welding process. Probably to keep the price low, the manufacturer had opted to supply the machine with short lengths of these thick cables. The welding machine itself was powered by a mains 230 Volt 13 Ampere wired plug.

So, if there was any welding to be done at site, the welding machine could be brought into position near to the work piece by using a normal mains extension wire. However, because of the short welding cables, the welding machine itself had to be brought near to the work piece. This was when the height-adjustable stand became useful. This was especially so if the work piece was higher than ground level. The stand enabled it to reach higher. For my workbench, it was ideal for welding. Because the welding machine was placed on a stand which was separated from the workbench, more space was available for the actual welding work.

The video shows the setting up of the welding machine stand.